Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

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Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto is one greatest naval commanders of World War II to the Japanese people and is idolized as hero. His legacy span’s from service during the battle of Tsushima Strait to the battle of Midway. Not only was he a brilliant naval commander he was an innovator and saw that the air power is the future of naval warfare and saw to the better aircraft for the Japanese navy. His methods to attack were unique and his opinions were always valued by those around him. Although he saw America as an enemy he respected the power and industrial might the United States held compared to Japan. He was once asked by the Japanese Prime Minister if Japan stood a chance against America. He replied, “We can run wild for six months or a year, but after that I have no confidence.” (Joseph). Yamamoto was born April 4th, 1884 and was the sixth son to Sadayoshi Takano. His name means 56 only because his father was 56 at his date of birth. At the age of 16 he joined the Japanese Imperial Navy and was sent to Japanese Naval Academy at Etajima. He graduated in 1904 and was stationed around the cruiser Nisshin and the participated in the battle for Tsushima Strait. He lost two fingers on his left hand, but because of his potential leaderships skills was sent to Naval Staff College in 1913. In 1919, Yamamoto was sent to study in America. He studied English in Harvard and also studied into the strengths and weakness of the US. He graduated in 1923 and was knowledgeable in naval aviation and viewed it as the future of naval combat. However, many believed that battleships were the key to naval combat and would ignore his ideals. Around the late 30’s because of his ideals were against the current regime Navy Minister Admiral Mitsumasa promoted him to Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Naval Fleet and was said to say “It was the only way to save his life…...

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