Consumer Behaviour for Orgainc Food

In: Business and Management

Submitted By manasikadane
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An Organic Centre Wales project

Consumer Attitudes towards
Organic Food
Survey of the General Public
Executive Summary

October 2010
Author
Chris Timmins,
Beaufort Research, Cardiff

Better Organic Business Links
The BOBL project is designed to support the primary producer in Wales and grow the market for Welsh organic produce in a sustainable way. The project will develop new, emerging and existing markets for organic produce whilst driving innovation, at all levels, within the supply chain. It will strive to increase the consumer demand and markets for organic produce, especially in the home market whilst also ensuring that the primary producers are aware of market demands. The project will provide valuable market information to prim ary producers and the organic sector in general. The overall aim is to support a thriving Welsh organic sector so that the benefits of WAG investment in the
Organic Farming Scheme to generate agri-environmental benefits, and in the
Welsh Organic Action Plan to support rural development and sustainable food production, can be fully realised.
Delivery of the project is divided into five main areas of work:






Driving innovation
Consumer information and image development of organic food and farming in Wales
Market development
Market intelligence
Addressing key structural problems within the sector.

For more information on this report or other BOBL activities please contact:
Sue Fowler, Director Organic Centre Wales on smf@aber.ac.uk
Dafydd Owen, BOBL Project Manager on odo@aber.ac.uk
Lucy Watkins, BOBL Supply Chains Officer on luw1@aber.ac.uk

An Organic Centre Wales Project
Canolfan Organig Cymru / Organic Centre Wales
IBERS - Aberystwyth University
Gogerddan Campus, Aberystwyth, SY23 3EB
01970 622248
Prepared for Organic Centre Wales by Chris Timmins Beaufort Research
2 Museum…...

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