Crr by Rbi, India

In: Business and Management

Submitted By rajatgarg
Words 551
Pages 3
rrCurent CRR 4.75

What is CRR? or What is CRR Ratio or CRR Rate : CRR means Cash Reserve Ratio. Banks in India are required to hold a certain proportion of their deposits in the form of cash. However, actually Banks don’t hold these as cash with themselves, but deposit such case with Reserve Bank of India (RBI) / currency chests, which is considered as equivlanet to holding cash with RBI. This minimum ratio (that is the part of the total deposits to be held as cash) is stipulated by the RBI and is known as the CRR or Cash Reserve Ratio. Thus, When a bank’s deposits increase by Rs100, and if the cash reserve ratio is 6%, the banks will have to hold additional Rs 6 with RBI and Bank will be able to use only Rs 94 for investments and lending / credit purpose. Therefore, higher the ratio (i.e. CRR), the lower is the amount that banks will be able to use for lending and investment. This power of RBI to reduce the lendable amount by increasing the CRR, makes it an instrument in the hands of a central bank through which it can control the amount that banks lend. Thus, it is a tool used by RBI to control liquidity in the banking system. Some non bankers also wrongly use CRR Ratio or CRR Rate instead of Cash Reserve Ratio ).Thus we can say that this serves duel purposes i.e.(a) ensures that a portion of bank deposits is kept with RBI and is totally risk-free, (b) enables RBI to control liquidity in the system, and thereby, inflation by tying the hands of the banks in lending money. |

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In 2006, Ceiling rates of CRR were abolished and now RBI can decide CRR on its own. Also RBI pays no interest on these deposits.
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If any bank defaults on this then it has to pay penalty on the default amount to RBI @ 3% above bank rate, during same fortnight.…...

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