Dialogue Between Rabbi and Athiest

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By mishianick
Words 1488
Pages 6
A Dialogue between a Rabbi and an Atheist about the Problem of Evil
(On a sunny Monday morning in Ukraine, Rabbi Samuel Goldfarb is taking a leisurely walk through the town marketplace. The Rabbi is well loved and respected in the community, always exchanging greeting with the townspeople. He comes upon a newcomer to the town, Radical
Enchain, whom he does not recognize and starts a polite conversation with him.)
Rabbi: Top of the morning to you sir. My name is Rabbi Samuel Goldfarb. I would like to welcome you to town. What is your name? What brings you to this lovely town in Ukraine?
Radislav: Nice to meet you Rabbi and good morning to you as well. My name is Radislav
Venchkin. I just emigrated here from Poland. I was looking for a fresh start so I’m here trying the town out and trying to get a feel for the town and its culture.
Rabbi: Radislav, you made an excellent choice. This town is a diverse town with a tight knit community. There is a close relationship between everyone in town even though it looks as if everyone is all over the place. I’m sure you will find it quite nice here.
Radislav: Well Rabbi, I would love to hear more in detail about the community and what it has to offer. May I speak with you in a more formal setting?
Rabbi: It would be my pleasure Radislav. I happen to be on my way to Temple in the center of town. I have scheduled an emergency prayer service for my congregation. With all the bad things happening in the world; hurricanes, tsunamis, terrorist attacks, wars, disease outbreaks and so on, many people are in the “dumps” so to speak. I feel that my congregation needs a time to come together and pray for the ones affected, and to pray for their own self-worth. I myself am directlyaffected. My son has died of cancer and my daughter is a paraplegic. I myself too have it very hard on myself. Would you like to…...

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