English Gilgamesh

In: English and Literature

Submitted By Aaronkajiel
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The mythical tale of ‘The epic of Gilgamesh’, first and foremost leads me to make the statement that in my own opinion most myths, or legends are born from actual events, actual people, and are manipulated, or exaggerated over time. The description and characteristics of Gilgamesh himself are the perfect example of exaggeration, “When the gods created Gilgamesh they gave him a perfect body. Shamash endowed him with beauty, Adad the god of the storm endowed him with courage, the great gods made his beauty perfect….Two thirds they made him god and they made him man.” These extreme references to Gilgamesh characteristics can be evaluated as a product of his impact on the time, and his actions. The The introduction of Enkidu seems to be that of pure imagination. “She dipped her hands in water and pinched off clay, she let it fall in the wilderness, and noble Enkidu was created.” Even his appearance sounded reminiscent of Sasquatch, Although Enkidu changes from a wild man into a noble one because of Gilgamesh, and their friendship changes Gilgamesh from a bully and a tyrant into an exemplary king and hero. Because they are evenly matched, Enkidu puts a check on Gilgamesh’s restless, powerful energies, and Gilgamesh pulls Enkidu out of his self-centeredness. Gilgamesh’s connection to Enkidu makes it possible for Gilgamesh to identify with his people’s interests. The death of Enkidu was imposed by the gods due to their actions in the forest, and the killing of Humbada, even though Gilgamesh was the actual guilty party.
Gilgamesh’ following journey in search of immortality is interesting, being that there was a place called Dilmun, apparently the gods gave him everlasting life for being there. His journey thereafter is confusing. The flood which was enforced by the gods was reminiscent to that of the one referred to in Christian bibles, and the reference of the…...

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