Surfside

In: Business and Management

Submitted By joyce765
Words 680
Pages 3
Case#2: Surfside
Problem:
Jentzen will make a recommendation on the current product mix based on the marketing plan. * Sell both Jacuzzi and Pacific * Only sell one of Jacuzzi and Pacific

Location: Newmarket * Small location with large and diverse shop and business sections * Well trained and educated employment workplace, average salaries$39500

Products: Pool toys and accessories, barbeques and patio furniture, hot tubs, etc.

Community relationship: Well-respected by the community, the winner of Readers’ choice award from 1998 to 2004. * Highest quality products/ Exceptional expertise/ good customer services

Change since 2004: * 12 different competitors entered newmarket area * Poor weather * No previous marketing strategy/ owners poor management skills/ difficult to confront with the issues

Jentzen Ideas: Renew hot tub divisions

Previous Jentzen’s implementation plan: Enhance both profitability and employee relations
Employee relations * Incentive system/performance appraisals
Profitability:
* Sponsorships/in-store seminars/direct mail campaigns/promotions
Do not have enough positive impact on its hot tubs sales situations.

Canadian hot tubs sales:
Ontario was the largest seller of hot tubs, representing 39% of all Canadian hot tub sales.

Consumers:
Three categories: Price-sensitive/quality-conscious/ dealer loyal * Price-sensitive:
Best value and lower price (inflected by sales promotions and flashy add-ons)/ entertainment value. * Quality-conscious
Focus on High quality/ relied on friends’ opinion/did lots research/ took a longer time to commit to purchase/motivated by health/therapeutic needs.

Dealer/Brand Loyalty * Prefer brand dealers’ suggestions/ have close relationship with dealers

Research Data:
Hot tubs buyers: age 35 to 55 married couples/ female…...

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