Write a Rejoinder to Margaret Thatcher’s Claim That ‘There Is No Such Thing as Society’

In: Social Issues

Submitted By RJC12262
Words 883
Pages 4
Everyone has their own definition of what they feel is society. The common characterization being that it is a community of people living in a particular region and having shared customs, laws, and organizations. There are a wide range of societies within our country which collectively form our British society. We are a formation of various races, religions and classes and it has been this way for as long as we can remember. Having dissimilarity in our country is what defines us as a group as well as individuals.

To say that there is no such thing as society is demonstrably false. Humans are born in groups, raised in groups, work in groups, play in groups, defend their interests in groups, and die in groups. These groups are organized, specialized, interdependent, and greater than the sum of their parts. In fact, individuals owe their very existence to group behaviour.

Human beings almost never live outside groups, and if they do, it is usually only briefly. True hermitism is extremely rare. Even such recluse authors and rugged individualists as Ralph Waldo Emerson (who wrote "nothing can bring you peace but yourself" in his essay ‘Self-Reliance’) depended on the publishing house and national sales to make him world famous and shore up his lifestyle.
As a society, which has grown up with the development of technology, we are judgemental; not only as a group but also as individuals. With access to such facilities as Photoshop, we are able to digitally enhance our appearance in photos to make us look more ‘attractive’ to our community- this is mainly used for publishing or on the internet. Then there are some who choose to take it a step further and physically change the way they look through plastic surgery; with this type of surgery developing by the minute, there is not much that doctors cannot do these days. The media also plays a part…...

Similar Documents

There Is No Such Thing as Society

...Did Thatcher break society and can the big society concept fix it? Stephen Hunt Politics With Marketing Management 1st May 2012 Contents Page 2 ‘There is no such thing as society’ 4 Thatcher in power 12 Labour and the big crash 15 the Big society concept 22 Conclusion 25 Bibliography ‘There is no such thing as society’ ‘There is no such thing as society;’ this one sentence spoken by Margaret Thatcher in an interview to woman’s own in 1987 was seen by her many critics as capturing the essence of her political mission. They believed that she wanted to remove the sense of community in Britain. The Thatcher ethos was seen as negativity towards the state’s role in people’s lives that it was up to each individual to look after him or herself. The Thatcher era was seen by many as about winners and losers, the winners were well rewarded with lower taxes, a property boom, rising wages, opportunities to purchase council houses and shares in the privatized companies at discount rates. If you had a job and money under the Thatcher government, there was multitude of opportunities. Whilst those who were without jobs and were dependant on welfare saw industries such as manufacturing decreasing in size, welfare payment cut in size, training being either cut or unfunded. They were expected to pay catch up with the winners on their own initiative without much help from the government. Much of the opposition came from the left, who Thatcher herself had little time for and......

Words: 8723 - Pages: 35

Assess the Claim That the Main Function of Education Is to Maintain a Value Consensus in Society.

...Assess the claim that the main function of education is to maintain a value consensus in society. Different sociologists believe that there are different functions of the education system. Some sociologists think that the main function of the education system is to maintain a value consensus in society while others think differently. In item A it states “Functionalists argue that value consensus - agreed social values - is essential for the well-being of society” They think that education transmits the norms and values to the students which would contribute towards the skills needed for work in the future. Education has many purposes such as secondary socialisation of children and allocation of roles. The functionalist perspective think that education helps maintain society by socialising young people into values of achievement, competition and equality of opportunity. Durkheim is a functionalist. He identified the two main functions of education were creating social solidarity and teaching specialist skills. Durkheim argues that society needs a sense of solidarity and without it, life would be impossible because each individual would pursue their own selfish desires. . Furthermore, he argues that education teaches individuals the specialist knowledge and skill that they need to play their part in the social division of labour, therefore the main function of education is to maintain a value consensus in society. Parson views education as being part of a......

Words: 462 - Pages: 2

Discuss Whether Margaret Thatcher Was a Pragmatist or an Ideologist

...Discuss Whether Margaret Thatcher was a Pragmatist or an Ideologist After Margaret Thatcher became Prime Minister in May 1979, the legislation to implement the ‘Right to Buy’ was passed in the Housing Act 1980 which had a huge impact on Britain's housing market. The high discounts made the offer a fantastic bargain for those lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time. It meant that there was some real growth in levels of owner occupation and was considered to be great for individuals. Half of the proceeds of the sales were paid to the local authorities, but they were restricted on spending the money (they were made to reduce their debt until it was cleared, rather than being able to spend it on building more homes). The effect was to reduce the council housing stock, especially in areas where property prices were high such as London and the south-east of England. 200,000 council houses were sold to their tenants in 1982, and by 1987, more than 1,000,000 council houses in Britain had been sold to their tenants, although the number of council houses purchased by tenants declined during the 1990s. The ‘Right to Buy’ can be argued to be both ideological and pragmatic. Firstly, it could be said that the reason that Margaret Thatcher followed through with this plan is because it appeases the traditional conservative ideology; that home owners are more likely to care for the society/the wellbeing of the country, including the responsibility of owning a home, if they......

Words: 991 - Pages: 4

A Rejoinder to "There Is No Such Thing as Society"

...Rebecca Jane Rigby 12JPO Sociology - Essay Write a rejoinder to Margaret Thatcher’s claim that ‘there is no such thing as society’ Everyone has their own definition of what they feel is society. The common characterization being that it is a community of people living in a particular region and having shared customs, laws, and organizations. There are a wide range of societies within our country which collectively form our British society. We are a formation of various races, religions and classes and it has been this way for as long as we can remember. Having dissimilarity in our country is what defines us as a group as well as individuals. To say that there is no such thing as society is demonstrably false. Humans are born in groups, raised in groups, work in groups, play in groups, defend their interests in groups, and die in groups. These groups are organized, specialized, interdependent, and greater than the sum of their parts. In fact, individuals owe their very existence to group behaviour. Human beings almost never live outside groups, and if they do, it is usually only briefly. True hermitism is extremely rare. Even such recluse authors and rugged individualists as Ralph Waldo Emerson (who wrote "nothing can bring you peace but yourself" in his essay ‘Self-Reliance’) depended on the publishing house and national sales to make him world famous and shore up his lifestyle. As a society, which has grown up with the development of technology, we are......

Words: 1161 - Pages: 5

Humanists Claims That the Meaning of a Thing Is Inherent in the Thing Itself, and That Language Simply Labels What Already Exists. Poststructuralists, on the Other Hand, Argue That Naming Is Constitutive. Critically

...Humanists claims that the meaning of a thing is inherent in the thing itself, and that language simply labels what already exists. Poststructuralists, on the other hand, argue that naming is constitutive. Critically analyze these competing perspectives and the arguments that are made in support of them. Humanism is essentially a belief system that is dictated by the way in which humans themselves, react, produce, and perform things. It is “the basic value system of humans…providing the fact that humanism is a human-centered system of meaning making”(Fuery & Mansfield, 2000; 209). In reference to the proposed argument, a humanist would see an object as a production of the human, and the language associated with that object is merely for convenience sake, to reiterate what said object is. This argument is reaffirmed by the concept of the existential self. This provides us with the view that we are separate and distinguishable from other objects and other people, which in turn suggests that whilst we interact with other humans and objects we are able to distinguish what and whom we are interacting with based on our own personal human development. “Humanisms are based on creating a system of meaning with man as its centre.”( R.Baltmann, 1982. P174) This is of course ‘man’ in the most general sense, as a collective. In order for people to gain meaning from such individualistic societies generalisations need to be made. It is impossible for a society to create an easily......

Words: 942 - Pages: 4

Margaret Thatcher

...The Iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher Margaret Thatcher’s political career has been one of the most remarkable of modern times. Born in October 1925 at Grantham, England, she rose to become the first woman to lead a major Western democracy. She won three successive General Elections and served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990. When Margaret Thatcher was Prime Minister of Great Britain, she was regularly singled out for her leadership. She was described in terms such as confident, iron willed, determined and decisive. Opinions on Margaret Thatcher remain divided after her death, but what is hard to argue with is that she was a great and influential leader. And here are three leadership qualities any leader can learn from Lady Thatcher: Passion, Determination and Confidence. Margaret Thatcher was able to lead the UK as the first, and so far only, female prime minister for 12 years and during that time was able to bring about many significant changes including the sales of council houses that allowed many families to own a house for the first time, privatization of utilities, as well as bringing in the disliked poll tax. She was also able to represent the UK well on a global stage by standing up to Europe and the Soviet Union. It was a Soviet journalist who named her the “Iron Lady” to depict her uncompromising politics and leadership style. She relished the nickname—showing full recognition of her powerful public image and demonstrating the strategic savvy to......

Words: 620 - Pages: 3

How Far Did ‘Luck’ Play a Part in Margaret Thatcher’s Leadership Election Victory of 1975?

...How far did ‘luck’ play a part in Margaret Thatcher’s leadership election victory of 1975? As is typical of history, Margaret Thatcher’s leadership election victory of 1975 has produced many differing views from historians on the extent of Margaret Thatcher’s good fortune in her ascent to power within the Conservative Party. The central focus of the debate is whether her election had mainly been due to luck- events that she had no real control over and had ‘fallen her way’, or whether, although some luck may have been involved, it had mainly been Thatcher’s own personal attributes and doing that allowed her to gain an unexpected majority over Ted Heath. Andrew Marr focuses predominately on ideological transitions within the Conservative Party. The general feeling conveyed in his chapter is that it was good fortune that had played the main part in her rise to power. Edward du Cann, and Keith Joseph, in his view, would have been worthier opponents more desirable to the Tory party, and it was their personal failings to stand for election that meant that Thatcher obtained votes ‘by default’; she had been the only reasonable candidate left standing, and thus obtained the votes necessary to win. Marr puts forward the idea that Thatcher essentially ‘adopted’ the Josephite figure and had good fortune as she inherited a policy that he had laboriously created and promoted, and had only received a large amount votes purely due to her association with the increasingly attractive......

Words: 2484 - Pages: 10

Criticaly Evaluate the Claim That Conscience Is Dictated by Society and Upbringing.

...Critically evaluate the claim that conscience is dictated by society an upbringing. Jean Piaget first postulated the idea that conscience is not the voice of God but a result from our upbringing and what we learn. He was a developmental psychologist who studied the behaviour of children. He theorised that children go through different stages in their understanding of the world around them, and it is not until the age of 10 that young people have a fully developed sense of morality. This scientific approach is very plausible because it is based on observations, and makes predictions that can be tested. For example, you can describe two different situations to a six year old, one of which is someone lying and a minor bad consequence arising, the other is someone accidentally causing a very negative consequence. For a six year old, the latter case would ‘make mummy more cross’ because their understanding is that something is bad because it hurts or upsets people. Ask an older child, and they will accurately say that a parent would be more cross with the child who told a lie. Piaget is showing that conscience is something we learn as we grow and develop. This theory seems to contradict Newman’s ideas. Newman was an intuitionist, believing that conscience is ‘the voice of God’. He believed that when faced with a moral decision, we get a sense of moral direction from God, which we can either listen to or ignore. Conscience is an ability to detect the right course of action. For...

Words: 1359 - Pages: 6

Why Has the Concept of the Big Society Failed to Catch the Public's Imagination?

...Why has the concept of the ‘Big Society’ failed to catch the public’s imagination? The concept of the ‘Big Society’ was developed as the flagship policy of the Conservative Party as part of the 2010 election campaign, an initiative designed to transfer powers from local government to the people of the community. The Big Society encompasses everything from free schools and libraries, to supporting local sports groups and repairing vandalised or damaged public property. Despite being championed as “the most important and radical part of the coalition government’s agenda” (Bishop & Green, 2011:30), the response from the British public has been underwhelming to say the least. Indeed, in its first year, a mere 24 free schools (schools funded by the government, but ran by parents, teachers, companies, religious groups or voluntary groups) were approved and opened. Furthermore, an Ipsos MORI poll (2010a) found that 60% of the public felt that the government was responsible for improving public services and public areas, and that they shouldn’t be calling on the public to do so. Various reasons exist for the Big Society failing to capture the public’s imagination; quite simply, many people just do not understand what exactly the Big Society is. Considering the current economic climate, it is also safe to say that most people do not care about what the Big Society is, as they have more pressing issues such as feeding their families and affording their energy bill......

Words: 3465 - Pages: 14

Assess the Claim That ‘the Main Function of Education Is to Maintain a Value Consensus’ in Society

...Value consensus is a term which refers to general agreement about norms and values amongst the members of society. Different theorists believe in different functions of the education system, some think it as promoting value consensus and some see as a method of control. Functionalists and Marxists have opposing views on the function of education which I will discuss in my essay, I will refer to sources from Durkheim, Parsons, Davis & Moore, Althusser and Bowles & Gintis and Willis and assess the function of education. Emile Durkheim, a functionalist’s view of education is that it teaches us the norms and value of society. Education helps to unite all the individuals of society which creates a sense of belonging and commitment to that society which he calls social solidarity. The way to reach this stage of harmony in society is to have norms and values which everyone agrees on. A way to criticise this idea is that the UK has become a multi-cultural society in which different people from different parts of the world live together. This means that we all have norms and values from our cultures which might lead to a conflict rather than value consensus as our values will go against each other. Another function of education in the case of Durkheim is that the school is a miniature version of school in which we are taught things in that prepare us for the future when we are in employment. Aspects such as ‘register’ throughout our school life teach us that punctuality is very......

Words: 1370 - Pages: 6

Deconstruction of an Argument by Margaret Mcmillan

...My deconstruction is based on the second piece from ‘History Handle with Care’ by Margaret McMillan. This article was published in Oxford Today Vol 22. Oxford today is a magazine developed for many of the previous students from Oxford. It was published on September 3rd 2010, 9 years since the attack on the World Trade Centre. Which may be why she focus’ the opening section of the article on the events surrounding that day. Margaret McMillan is a professor of international history at the University of Oxford she has written many books on the Great War and the struggles of what these wars do to peace throughout the world. From what I can gather, the main argument being portrayed here is that of how these days history is too quickly made. What I mean by this is that we too quickly accept what is told to us as definitive history, be that by people of power or leaders of nations. It says that we should take what is told to us with a pinch of salt as even historians can read incorrectly what is being said through time. She also makes the point that we put too much confidence into what we are told by our leaders and simply go with it almost blindly without any disregard to if it is true or not. She opens up her case by discussing what another author overheard in a bar on the evening of September 11th 2001, that a pair of men was comparing the World Trade Centre attacks to that of Pearl Harbour in 1941. One of the men said to the other that it was the Vietnamese who bombed Pearl......

Words: 1243 - Pages: 5

Margaret Thatcher

...“Which person or event do you think had the greatest impact in the creation of modern Britain in the period 1945-2007?” It can be said that one of the most influential and successful people that changed Britain’s political views for the better and had the greatest impact on modern Britain is Margaret Thatcher. Born in October 1925 at Grantham, Thatcher came from a humble background but was soon to become one of the most remarkable politicians the likes of Britain has never seen. The first and most important impact Margaret Thatcher had on modern Britain was her astonishing and strong leadership. Her transformative governance did not only change the course of Britain but also Europe. She contributed to the fall of the Berlin Wall which started a major transformation of central and eastern European economies. Thatcher’s own belief in her skills and goals helped her gain the title of the first (and only) female Prime Minister in which many admired and still do today. Another huge contribution Margaret Thatcher had on modern Britain was how she turned the economy around because of her many valuable ideas. Margaret Thatcher was instrumental in putting a stop to the power of the trade unions. Millions of days a year were being lost through strike action and this was extremely harmful to the British economy. By the end of her leadership these days were down to a fraction of what they had been. Mr Scargill, an influential trade leader, has been used to calling a strike by a......

Words: 838 - Pages: 4

Colonization and Superstition: Themes in Things Fall Apart That Mirror Society

...The novel Things Fall Apart is a classic novel that was written in 1958 by African author Chinua Achebe. This timeless novel about the Ibo people of Nigeria mirrors society in many different ways. Two recurring themes in the novel are colonization and superstition, and they each mirror society in their own individual way. Many of the superstitions that we are familiar with today do not seem to be as far-fetched as the ones depicted in the novel, and yet the society we live in is still very superstitious. One may argue that colonization is a thing of the past, but the affects of colonization are still being felt in many places around the world to this day. Colonization and superstition are major themes illustrated in the novel Things Fall Apart and they also mirror life in our society today. The affects of colonization in Chinua Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart are very prominent towards the end of the novel. After the missionaries have settled in Umuofia, the dynamic of the villages change. Obeirika, Okonkwo’s closest friend comments on the smarts of the “white man” in this excerpt from the novel: “The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one. He has put a knife on things that held us together and we have fallen apart” (Achebe, 176). This quote heavily demonstrates the effects of colonization on the Ibo people.......

Words: 980 - Pages: 4

2015 "Do the Write Thing" Challenge

...2015 “Do the Write Thing” Challenge Teen violence is a huge problem in the United States. Many people, including teachers, students, and parents try to stop it, but sometimes it’s not enough. Teen violence has grown throughout the years. It has many causes and has affected many people’s lives. Everyone is affected whether you are the person being wronged or not. So, how has youth violence affected me, what are some of the causes of youth violence and what can I do to stop it? Assuredly, violence has affected my life in a negative way, but not directly. When I hear a student being called names, see them being harassed, or watch a news report detailing physical or mental abuse of a youth, it fills me with anger, sadness and sometimes fear. It’s horrible that this sort of thing happens and ignoring it only makes matters worse. Our schools do their part with helping students with the prevention of bullying and by having guidance counselors on hand to address any issues that arise. At my middle school there’s a rule that requires all students to sit at the lunch table of their designated third period class. One of the reasons for this rule is to prevent a bully from a different class from sitting at a table and harassing another student during lunch. Unfortunately, this rule negatively affects me and many of the other students. If your lunch period were the only opportunity for you to sit with a friend that wasn’t in your third period class, you would be unable to do so......

Words: 810 - Pages: 4

Assess the Claim That the Main Function of Education Is to Maintain a Value Consensus in Society.

...The claim that the main function of education is to maintain a value consensus in society is portrayed by different sociologists in different ways e.g. feminists believe that to maintain a value consensus in society, patriarchy needs to be abolished. Different theorists believe in different functions of the education system, some think of it as promoting value consensus and some see otherwise. Functionalist Durkheim (1993) identified the two main functions of education were, creating social solidarity and teaching specialist skills. Durkheim argues that society needs a sense of solidarity, without social solidarity, social life and cooperation would be impossible because each individual would pursue their own selfish desires; the role of education is to produce social solidarity. School also acts as a ‘society in miniature’, preparing us for life in wider society, school serves a function that cannot be provided the family or peer groups and that individuals must learn to cooperate with those who are neither family nor friends, he says the school is a place where these skills can be learned. Modern industrial economies have a complex division of labour, where the production of even a single item usually involves the cooperation of many different specialists. Durkheim argues that education teaches individuals the specialist knowledge and skill that they need to play their part in the social division of labour, therefore the main function of education is to maintain a......

Words: 1857 - Pages: 8

Copyright | Campus Heroes | Télécharger / Regarder